Resources for the Literacy Strategies

Strategies Introduced by the Groups

Hot seat

-What is it?

-How to do it

-How to use it

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Word Ladders

-What is it??

-Why is it used?

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Tea Party

-What it is/ how it works

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

-video

Word Wall

-What is it?

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Reader’s Theatre

-What is it?

-Materials

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

-video

Quick Write

-What is it?

-How to use it

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Collaborative Books

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

-video

Storyboards

-What is it?

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Questioning the Author

-What is it?

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

video

Open-minded Portrait

-what is it?

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Sketch to Stretch

-What is it?

-How to use it

-video

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Double Entry Journal

-What is it?

-Literacy Strategies (Compendium)

Strategies Introduced in Class

Reading Log

-What is it?

Morning Message

-What is it?

-video

-video

Portfolio

-video

Advertisements

Portfolios

Portfolios are… a great tool to help students feel ownership over their work. They also encourage students to be more responsible, allow students to set goals that they are motivated to achieve, and allow students to make connections between learning and assessing.

How it works…

  1. throughout the term, students complete assignments
  2. the students then create criteria for what they will be including in their portfolio
  3. the students then filter through their completed assignments and determine what they will include in their portfolio
  4. Once this is completed, it is often used as an assessment tool at parent-teacher interviews or student lead conferences to show student growth

 

Morning Message

A morning message… can look different in every classroom. Generally, it is a message written by the teacher to the students to welcome them to the start of a new school day. Many morning messages can be used as an agenda for the day.

How it works…

  1. the teacher prepares the morning message
  2. the students come into the classroom in the morning
  3. As a class, the students will read out the morning message and go over what it is covering
  4. Go about their regular morning routine

What it provides… a form of shared reading. It also allows you to start off the class on a positive note without throwing the students directly into instruction. It allows you as an educator to set the tone that you would like to carry through the rest of the day.

You can include…

  • the date
  • the weather
  • holidays
  • birthdays
  • assignments that could be due
  • things that you are covering in class (today we will be learning about…)

Examples of a morning message…

Reading Logs

Reading logs… are simply put an easy way for educators to keep track of what the students are reading.

How it looks throughout the years…

K-3…

  • mostly picture books
  • may not see a lot of variety
  • content/ length is not as important
  • may be worked on at home with parents

4-6…

  • begins to integrate chapter books
  • begins to have a variety of genres
  • themes start to emerge
  • students will do largely independently
  • students can include summaries in heir reading log

6-8…

  • done independently
  • consists of a variety of text types/ genres
  • students can complete summaries and predictions
  • they can identify themes
  • note important quotes, key details, important moments
  • begin to identify figurative language

For our class, we had to keep a reading log and read 10-14 books throughout the semester to model what this would look like when we introduced the same strategy to our students. It was interesting to see how much of a pain it could be as an assignment when you fell behind. It was, however, a good reflective piece and it was rewarding to see what I had accomplished and learned at the end of the semester.

Some examples of Reading Logs…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Double Entry Journal

Double entry journal is… used to help students state and support their opinions using evidence. It also assists the students in understanding the content that they are reading. This allows the students to be more involved in the content that they are reading as they write and reflect on it.

How it works… 

  1. Give the students a piece of text to use
  2. Give the students a blank double entry journal or have them make their own in a notebook that they can keep as a running record through the class.
  3. Have the students read the text and make notes on one side of their journal as they find them that they would like to understand further (quotes/ ideas)
  4. Once they have finished reading they can use the other side of the journal to analyze the information that they recorded on the other side and make connections.
  5. As a class, you would then hold a discussion to share the student’s thoughts and feelings while they experienced and what they discovered after looking into it further.

Examples of a double entry journal…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Sketch-to-Stretch

Sketch-to-Stretch is… used to help students increase their understanding of a concept. It will help students draw on prior knowledge, make connections, identify main ideas/ details, summarize and synthesize information and visualize ideas.

How it works… 

  1. Have the students read
  2. Hand out paper
  3. Have the students sketch out key ideas and details from the selection
  4. Students will then present their drawings and verbally explain how their illustrations connect to what they read.

Alternative ways to use sketch-to-stretch…

-it can be used as a pre-reading activity to make connections to their prior knowledge or to make predictions.

-it can be used in group activities, having each member of the group connect with a different portion of the story and then organizing them into a comic-style book.

Example of the sketch-to-stretch template…

sts

In the classroom…

Open-Minded Portraits

Open-minded Portraits are… used to help students think more deeply about a character or a person. It can also be used as a tool to help students reflect on the events that took place in the story.

How it works…

  1. the teacher will hand out a blank open-minded portrait. Or if the teacher chooses you can have the students draw out a blank head.
  2. The students will then fill in the space within the head with pictures and words/ phrases that they visualize when they are reflecting on a certain character or situation within a piece of literature.
  3. They can then cut out the shape of the head
  4. On the back side, they can include a written reflection that summarizes their visual on the front.
  5. The students can then share their open-minded portraits with the class.

How it can be used outside of ELA…

This could easily be used in other subject areas as a reflection tool. It could be used to:

-Summarize their experience doing an experiment in Science

-Reflect on complex concepts that they covered in Social Studies

Some examples…

 

Questioning the Author

Questioning the author is… a literacy strategy used to engage students in reading to help solidify their understanding of a piece of text. It encourages students to ask questions while reading and critique the writing.

How it works…

  1. the teacher will select a text (this can be a poem, a short story, or a novel)
  2. Before reading the teacher will have to determine points during reading that will be an appropriate point to stop to help deepen the students understanding.
  3. Have questions prepared that will help prompt the students to ask their own questions.
  4. During the first pause help the students through finding their own questions. Model what this should look like.

Thoughts… I like this literacy strategy, and I would definitely start integrating it early on. Having the students question what they are being read will help them think more critically down the road.

How it looks in the classroom…

Storyboards

Storyboards are… cards that have illustrations and texts from a picture book attached

How it works…

  1. the teacher cuts apart two copies of the picture book and put the pieces on cards
  2. the students will then have to organize the cards
  3. they will rearrange the cards so that they take place in the correct order
  4. they will then read the story to see if it makes sense
  5. they will then read the original story to see how they did.

Experience with this strategy… this was practiced on us in class. It was surprisingly difficult to do. They used a story that had some more difficult language and there were a few events that were hard to interpret. However, it made you think more critically when you were attempting to organize it.

 

Collaborative Books

How it works… students work together as a group to create a book together. They individually create one page or section of the book. They will work together to put it together.

  1. A topic must be chosen- the teacher will choose the main topic, then each student will decide their own sub-topic for their own section of the book.
  2. Introduce the design to the students- show the students what you expect their finished product to look like. Advise them that there is room for both a written and visual portion within their page/ section.
  3. Making the rough draft- students will make up a rough draft of their written portion. They will then form revision groups. They will be given feedback and be given the opportunity to make edits and corrections.
  4. They will make their final copy
  5. Collect the pages- the teacher will collect the completed pages from the students and organize it into a book
  6. Make copies- the teacher will make copies of the book for each student and then give the final copies. Or one copy could get bound and kept in the classroom library.